The burning heat of Texas must mess with peoples heads! If you don't believe me, just look at the Bushs and the band GhoulTown! Ghoultown have mixed Punk, Metal, and Country Western music with Cowboys and Undead to form a completly orginal sound. They use trumpets and Acoustic guitars to combine a Western Movies soundtrack vibe with their horror punk influences. These guys are just plain fun on Cd and live.
Check them out if you like people who think for themselves and tell trends to "die!" As Jake MiddleFinger was deciding if he would rather hang me up or bury me, I got a chance to as him the following questions.

Prof.ManiC: How and when did you come up with the idea to do/form Ghoultown? Can you give a brief history of the band too?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
The idea for Ghoultown came up around 96/97 from vocalist Count Lyle. Lyle is also a writer and started working on a new story about a strange, undead Texas. A twisted western sort of. In this desolate place was a town where ghouls survived. Of course this town would have a drinkin' saloon and the house band in this saloon would be one hell-ova band. He started putting this band together in real life and soon got side-tracked from the book.
Prof.ManiC: The whole undead Wild West idea is kind of original to me, has someone done it before you? What bands, books and movies did you use to help form the blue print for your band concept?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
It's not been done like we do it, I don't think. We are all big fans of horror bands, films, and books. We've been fortunate enough to have grown up with the best of the best, and the worst of the worst of all of it. From bands like Fields of the Nephilim to Monster Magnet, from The Misfits to Mary Robbins, from movies like "A Few Dollars More" to "Monster Club", these scratch the surface of underlying inspiration.
Prof.ManiC: Was having trumpets in it part of original concept or did it take experimentation and evolving as a band to add them?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
Trumpets were part of the original concept. You can't have an evil spaghetti -western band without horns.
Prof.ManiC: Why does the band have a studio trumpet player and a touring one? Are the trumpet parts changed at all for the live shows?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
Our original trumpet player, J. Luis, got to a point where he couldn't keep up with the touring schedule anymore, so we had to find a trumpet player that could travel the dusty trails with us. Finding the right horn player for this band wasn't easy. All the CDs were recorded before Dez Black was in the band, so he's not been in the studio. J. Luis still does the occasional show with us, which makes for a huge sounding horn section. The horn parts stay the same live as they are on the disc.
Prof.ManiC: What do you think having an Acoustic guitar adds? Do you treat it as a 2nd bass or a 3rd guitar?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
The acoustic guitar is its own instrument, and that's how we treat it. It's full and lush, and really rounds out the rhythm section. It frees the electrics to go further off the beaten path, when necessary. Just like the horns, I mean you couldn't sound very spaghetti western without an authentic acoustic guitar sound in there.
Prof.ManiC:
Speaking of live shows how did you last tour end up? Where were your biggest followings? Did you break even or what, when it was all said and done?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
The tour was a success. We had a chance to get out and meet fans everywhere that have been waiting to see us, and to make some new fans. We love playing live. Our live show is where it all comes together and you can tell what this band is made of. It was great to get to play every night.
Prof.ManiC: How hard is it to create music and lyrics that stick within your undead western aura? Do you think it will ever stifle your creativity?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
What we're doing is what comes naturally to us. All of us having grown up in Texas, we have those Texan roots. Even our previous bands, those roots were starting to show through more and more, especially in The Killcreeps. We're all a bit kooky and are twisted horror freaks, naturally. We inspire each other and throw ideas into a big boiling pot. Writing with Ghoultown sparks new ideas and visions all of the time. It doesn't seem like we struggle to create something Ghoultown, it just happens when we get together.
Prof.ManiC: In general, what to you try to incorporate into your music from the following genres: Metal, Punk, Country, Movie Soundtracks?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
We all grew up playing in punk and metal bands. That's what we've cut our collective teeth on and you can hear that in our attack. Movie soundtracks are so big and dramatic. I think with Ghoultown being a big band, and a visual band, we incorporate those elements. The C&W aspect comes just from being from Texas
Prof.ManiC: How has the reaction and sales been for "Give 'Em, More Rope" been?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
Especially after the tour, the sales have been really good. We sold a couple thousand right when it came out which was amazing. We've had a better reaction to this new one than we did with the first one. People seem to like it and it shows how the band is progressing.
Prof.ManiC: Has the band started on the follow up? Will the lineup and approach be the same as the last album? Any inside info you would like to share?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
We've been asked to record a couple of songs for a new John Keeyes movie, "Blood and Roses", so we've been preparing for that right now. As far as a new disc, we don't have any set date to start recording. We have about 4 or 5 songs for it so far. We have played some of our newer material live recently, and had great response.
Prof.ManiC: Speaking of lineups, Anna Oakley seems play do quite abit for the band. Is she an un-official member of the band or a hired hand?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
Anna Oakley takes care of the stuff that the rest of us wouldn't touch with a ten foot branding iron. Even in Ghoultown, the music biz is a business, and she takes care of it. Her and Sandy the Temptress also lent their voices quite a bit on the new disc. As if that's not enough to earn a Sheriff's badge, they also take care of the merch. We're proud to have them as part of the Ghoul family.
Prof.ManiC: How and why was the Ghoultown comic done? Was it planned and done by the band or did an outside group approach the band about it?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
Lyle's been wanting to do a comic for awhile, but got side-tracked by the success of the band. He met a publisher, Bad Moon Studios, at one of our shows and pitched the idea. And here it is. They are doing a four issue mini-series to see how that goes.
Prof.ManiC: What plans for the future does the band have?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:

There has been talk about a robotic Ghoultown. More "Westworld" than that Eastwood stuff. We have crews working on the robots right now.
Prof.ManiC: What are your favorite movies, books , music and people of all time?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:
It's so hard to narrow down to even just a few favorites. There is so much great talent and pieces of work out that I admire.
Prof.ManiC: When learning a new song, do you try to learn the guitar parts first then the vocals or do you start from the beginning doing both? What words of wisdom can you offer up to people like me who hope to be able to do both someday?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:

Every song has its own way of coming to life. Lyle, being a writer, has a vast collection of lyrics stowed away, but it doesn't always start with that. Just elaborating on ideas leads to completing the puzzle. It just depends on the song and the circumstances really.
Prof.ManiC: Any Final Comments or bitches?
JAKE MIDDLEFINGER:

Eat more Ghoultown!