Well here's some mental Pyschosurgery between me and ANDREAS STOLTZ the guitarist and vocalist for a band out of SWEDEN called HOLLOW. If your not familiar with the band they have some of the most thought provoking lyrics this side of NEVERMORE and SKYCLAD.To me they have a very original sound at times very emotional then all the sudeen very heavy. So you'll just have to take my word for it, take HOLLOW CD's MODERN CATHEDRAL and ARCHITECT OF THE MIND and e-mail me in the morning
Prof.ManiC: How did HOLLOW come about?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
The bass player, Thomas Nilsson, and I went to senior high school and did our military service together. We found out that we shared a similar taste in music and the idea of forming a band started to grow. None of us had any real experience of either playing an instrument or in a band when we left the military, but that didn't stop us. Some friends of his joined us and we rehearsed and wrote music for a couple of years until we released the mini-CD "Hollow" in 94. I've always been very into the lyrics of whatever music I listen to, and I've been writing since my early teens. I suppose it was just the logical thing to learn how to play an instrument and subsequently start playing in a band.
Prof.ManiC: For the people out there who aren't familiar with your band HOLLOW could you please describe to them your sound and message?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
Hollow's songs are very much about melodies and, at least for me, lyrical content. The music adheres to the tradition of bands such as Judas Priest and Queensr˙che, at least as they sounded in the late 80's. It's traditional yet contemporary, if that makes any sense. I find a lot of inspiration in bands like Nevermore and Fates Warning.
Prof.ManiC: What inspired you for the lyrics to MODERN CATHEDRAL? ARCHITECT OF THE MIND?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
The songs on MC were written over a period of several years, and are very different from each other on a lyrical plane. The song "Crusaders" deals with the historical view and how it is formed by the ones writing it. My inspiration comes from everyday things, ranging from a news flash to clashes in a relationship. The last song on MC, "Waiting" came to me in a dream where I met a lady who was the way ladies tend to be, elusive and hard to grasp. AOTM, on the other hand, tells a story from beginning to end about a man who creates artificial life. The lyrics deal with his responsibility for his creation, and its demands for a context to live in. The lyrics can be interpreted in many ways, for instance from a religious perspective. I was mainly inspired to write on this theme by science-fiction. I am very into Sci-fi and the apparent parallel is of course The Lawnmower Man.
Prof.ManiC: How many albums are you contracted with Nuclear Blast? Are they promoting you better in Europe then in the states?(hopefully)? Are you happy with with what they have done so far? What do you hope they do in the future?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
Now, here's news for you! Nuclear Blast have canceled the contract. As of yet we haven't found a new label, so the future is unknown. To tell you the truth we weren't very pleased with the way they dealt with things, so I think this really is for the best. Right now we are recording new material and looking for a new partner.
Prof.ManiC: What country is HOLLOW's biggest following?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
I would say that it´s in Europe, Germany and the Eastern parts of Europe. We get a lot of fan mail from the U.S., but we have't got any recent figures of sales there.
Prof.ManiC: Are you working on any other projects?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
There has been some talk about me helping out with the backing vocals on Nocturnal Rites coming album. That's basically it.
Prof.ManiC: How did the track "REBELLION" come about for DEATH IS JUST THE BEGINNING 5?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
Originally we recorded that song as a bonus track for the Asian edition of AOTM, but for some unknown reason it didn´t make it. It´s a good song, and Nuclear Blast wanted previously unreleased material for the compilation. Furthermore it didn´t quite fit into the lyrical context of AOTM.
Prof.ManiC: What's in the future for HOLLOW? New CD? TOUR?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
As I said, we're in between labels right now. But hopefully a new album in a couple of months (several couples of months). These things tend to take time.
Prof.ManiC: Any projects from your past that people might be able to track down?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
We have released a demo tape previous to the mini-CD, but it's VERY hard to come across.
Prof.ManiC: Where were you born and raised?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
I was born in the North of Sweden. I grew up in a small village outside of a town called Umea and moved there when I got older.
Prof.ManiC: What inspired you start playing? singing? How Old were you?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
I started playing the guitar when I was 18. Singing has always been central in my family, so I've been doing that since I was a child.
Prof.ManiC: Since your a CRIMSON GLORY fan and NEVERMORE fan what do you think of their new cd's?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
Crimson Glory - I miss Midnight. What else is there to say? Nevermore - They are just great. And they get better from one album to the next.
Prof.ManiC: What cd's have you been listening to lately?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
Old Queensr˙che. The Warning and Rage for Order. Also Bruce Dickinson's The Chemical Wedding, which I think is very good. It´s a shame he's going back to Iron Maiden.
Prof.ManiC: What Sci-fi movies and book are you been into lately?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
I am reading Orson Scott Card´s books about Ender. I can really recommend him to anyone who´s into Sci-fi. Some films I have seen and liked are Event Horizon with Sam Neill and Matrix (even if Reeves wouldn´t know how to act if his life depended on it). The Phantom Menace, which came to Sweden this August, was a major disappointment.
Prof.ManiC: What are your 'Predictions' for computers and the Internet in perhaps the next 5-10 years?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
Computers will run the world in 10 years. We will be their slaves and they will force us to type things for them. No, seriously, I don´t think that much will happen in 10 years. We won't notice them as much. I don´t think I will need to be sitting in a room like I am now, to communicate with people over the internet. But there´s a big risk here, and it's that people who can't afford to keep up with the pace stand at risk of being left behind and outside of this vast community. And that is a question of democracy which I think should be discussed more.
Prof.ManiC: What do you think of Black metal?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
I listened to Black metal as a kid. Mercyful Fate and such. I can understand the attraction it has on people, but I think there are more important things to convey lyrically than that it's good to be bad.
Prof.ManiC: Since my page is devoted to metal and using it to help people control or at least understand their emotions, mind telling us what you like to do when your feeling down or pissed off to take you mind off it?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
A lot of that is transformed into either music or lyrics. I think I'm rather level-minded, but of course there are things that really disturbs me and makes me angry. Often, the root of those emotions is in myself. I try to find reasons to why I feel the way I do, and for the most part people just have very little to do with my state of mind. When I feel down I withdraw from other people. I don't think sharing those moods takes them away. You have to come up with a solution for yourself.
Prof.ManiC: If you could form a "SUPERGROUP" with anyone in the world(or time) who would you pick and why? What would be the aim or message of the band?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
Bass: Geezer Butler (Black Sabbath) Guitar: Andy laRoque (King Diamond) Drums: (Scott Travis) The message would be that heavy metal persists over time and generations.
Prof.ManiC: Any Final Comments?
ANDREAS
STOLTZ:
To the fans out there: Be patient. The story continues.