Once again I break a norm and interview another person not in a band!! The following mental psychosurgery is with the person known as Prof.Metal (no relation of course) who runs a great power metal radio show in the what i consider the best metal town in the states Cleveland.(but i hear chicago rocks too but i didnt have time to check it out when i was there) Lets now learn what it take to be a TRUE METAL fan from someone who was smart enough to get his cd's for free!!

Prof.ManiC: Well let's start off at the beginning. What albums started you being a metalhead? What was the thing that awed you the most about them?
Prof.
METAL:

Believe it or not, but my metal roots go back to the mid-80's with bands like Bon Jovi, Poison, Guns n' Roses, and Motley Crue. I distinctly remember being in 4th grade buying Motley Crue's Theatre of Pain and Girls, Girls, Girls from one of my friends who didn't want them. I also remember giving a speech on GNR in that same 4th grade class, ending the speech by playing "Sweet Child O' Mine" on my stereo. I also remember getting in trouble in the 5th grade for having pictures of Skid Row and Sebastian Bach hanging in my locker at school. I do also remember being fascinated by Iron Maiden posters around that time or even earlier. Eventually, that led me to start listening to Seventh Son and Somewhere in Time. My room, back then and to this day, is wallpapered with Maiden posters. From all those bands I began listening to more traditional metal bands like Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, Megadeth, and Metallica. I remember buying Megadeth's Countdown to Extinction album when it came out as well as the Iron Maiden Fear of the Dark release. I saw my first concert back in 92 when I was in 8th grade, when Maiden came through Cleveland for the last time before Bruce left.

I owe my interest in metal mainly to my older brother (aka The Metal Warrior) who sparked my interest in many of these bands back in those days. I think it works the other way now most of the time, with me turning him onto many of the European and less mainstream metal bands.

Though I listen to a lot of power metal these days, I do still enjoy listening to some of those albums that turned me on to hard rock and metal in the first place. I don't exactly play Poison or GNR or Motley Crue on the show or anything, but I do really enjoy some of their albums - they're classics.

Prof.ManiC: How did you get the chance to do your radio show? Did you have experience or is it part of your schooling?
Prof.
METAL:
To be honest, I don't even remember why I wanted to get a radio show in the first place. But as far as actually getting one, I found out when they had meetings on campus to train for it, and I showed up every week for the training. I submitted a demo tape of a 30 minute show I put together, which I actually found the other day (man it sounds horrible), and then I applied for a show. The rest is history. I had no experience or schooling at all, and I don't really plan on pursuing a career, simply b/c I know that no one's going to pay for me to play metal on the radio and interview bands. My first show was on Christmas Day of 1997. When I began, I knew nothing of all these European bands and everything, but I made it my goal to earn my Ph.D. in metal, and I think I've achieved that at this point.
Prof.ManiC: How did you end up getting the second show? How long have you been doing them?
Prof.
METAL:
Well, the first station kind of kicked me off the air for a semester due to some problems between me and a record label, so I decided to pursue finding a show elsewhere as a backup plan. They wanted me there, and so I went through their training and got a show. It has worked out extremely well because it gives me a lot more freedom when it comes to in-studio interviews. It's also nice because I get to play a lot of stuff I normally wouldn't play if I was still limited to a couple hours a week. I've been at WJCU since the end of 1997 and at WRUW since the spring of 1999.
Prof.ManiC: What emotions were going through your head during the 1st show? How nervous were you?
Prof.
METAL:
It wasn't the first time I was behind the mic, because when I did training, I actually sat in on a show for a few weeks before being allowed in there to do my own show. I remember being with The Metal Warrior in the studio and being worried that no one would be listening or would even call in for requests. I was wrong about my suspicions, and we received quite a few calls. I was very nervous on the air back then, and that nervousness comes and goes even today. It's usually caused by having other people in the studio.
Prof.ManiC: How did it feel when you got your first promo package from a label?
Prof.
METAL:
It happened a couple years ago, and I've received hundreds since, so I honestly can't even remember. To this day, I still get a chuckle when I arrive home to find packages addressed to Doctor Metal. Ultimately, I'm always elated because getting this stuff means I don't have to fork over 20-30 dollars every time a new CD comes out.
Prof.ManiC: Who was the first band member to call in for an interview? How did it up going?
Prof.
METAL:
My first interview was with Rikard Stjernquist of Jag Panzer all the way back in February 1998. I was very nervous when he called because neither I nor the station manager at WJCU could get everything on the board working correctly. After 5 minutes of trying and coming very close to giving up, it all fell into place and the interview began. I was very pleased with the interview. Rikard and I chatted for an hour or so. To my disappointment, I later found out of course that all interviews do not go so well. I'm sure you know the feeling right about now. :)
Prof.ManiC: What in studio appearance had you sitting there thinking "I can't believe this is happening?" How did it end up going?
Prof.
METAL:

Well, I don't know quite how you mean this. If you mean I'm in awe over having a certain band or artist in the studio, then I think I'd apply that to my in-studio appearances of Savatage members, especially in June of 1998 with Jon Oliva and Chris Caffery. Just a year and a half before that, I had become a huge fan of the band, buying up most of their albums and getting into the Trans-Siberian Orchestra's first album. I remember playing all of the stuff for my girlfriend at the time, and she even got into them. By the way, I've found that Savatage is usually a good band to play for chicks, because it's got a lot of stuff people don't generally think of when you tell them you listen to metal. Then, only a couple years later, I'm sitting in the studio for an hour across from Chris and Jon and driving them back to their hotel after the show. This was also the case around Christmas when TSO played 3 shows here in Cleveland, and I had Johnny, Chris, and Jeff in the studio. I've yet to find anyone involved in the business nicer than the guys from Savatage. I don't count Al Pitrelli as being part of that bunch though.

If you mean that I was shocked by what was going on, I'd probably characterize D.C. Cooper's appearances like that, simply because he's wacky on the air. He does all kinds of impressions and voices and stuff, and it's made for a really funny show every time he's been in the studio. I prefer appearances like that because with him, it's like hanging out with a friend of mine and just having a conversation while we're on the air instead of the same boring standard interview questions.

Prof.ManiC: Is there anyone who you been trying to get an interview with but you just can't seem to get a hold of them? Is there anyone who won't do one just because they are pricks?
Prof.
METAL:
No one has refused an interview, but ultimately I'd like to interview Ozzy and Rob Halford, and maybe Dave Mustaine if he starts doing real metal again. Outside of that, I've been pretty satisfied with the guests on the show.
Prof.ManiC: How long will you do the shows? When will you know it's time to sign off for the last time?
Prof.
METAL:
As long as the stations allow me to keep shows, I'll do them. That's of course provided I continue to live in the Cleveland area. I don't anticipate the day when I'll give up the website at all, regardless of where I move. I do become burned out once in awhile, because it's tough work keeping a site of that size updated and everything, but I usually just take breaks from it for a few days at a time and resume work.
Prof.ManiC: What do you think of people who would rather download a whole CD off say LYCOS than support a band busting their ass to try to make a living?
Prof.
METAL:
I'm not quite sure what you mean here. If you're talking about people ripping off whole albums from the internet, then I would say I don't really support that. I am, however, totally in support of people downloading one or two MP3's from a particular album to get a taste for the band. The internet has done some great things for metal, particularly in the past year or two even, because there's no way for people to hear all this great European stuff other than through the web. I think metal's always been great in that people spread the word from person to person, and the internet has just continued that but on a much greater scale.
Prof.ManiC: For those people out there like myself who what to support the scene with their time, money and energy, what advice can you give them when it comes to starting a webpage or a radio show?
Prof.
METAL:
My advice for both is very simple - do what you want to do. Be honest with your listeners, with bands, and with labels and promotion companies. If someone doesn't like your show, don't worry about it. If you're not playing what they want (for my listeners in Cleveland, that's often Slayer, Pantera, Limp Bizkit, Coal Chamber, etc...), don't worry about it. If a local band sends you some crappy music and tries to bully you into playing it or putting them on the air by throwing free stuff at you, tell them to get lost. The same goes for record labels, management, and promotion companies. The best support and promotion you can give is honest promotion. Don't support shit, because you'll lose your credibility with everyone when they find out that album or band you're hyping sucks.
Prof.ManiC: Personally i fear metal becoming mainstream again...what do you think will happen if big companies get back into the scene? Will MTV and company corrupt it again or will they learn from the late 80's?
Prof.
METAL:

True metal will never become mainstream again. I would bet money that we won't ever see Stratovarius performing on VH1 or MTV here in the States. So it's not a real concern. I am concerned about record labels signing all these power metal bands, because in many cases, they're signing some real mediocre acts and totally abusing the power metal or melodic metal label. I don't fear big companies here in the US becoming involved with acts like Gamma Ray, Primal Fear, and Edguy though. It's just not going to happen any time soon.

Also, I don't think any of these people learned their lesson from the late 80's - they learned instead that for a certain amount of time, they can make a whole lot of money supporting crappy music.

Prof.ManiC: If you could form a "SUPERGROUP" with anyone in the world(or time) who would you pick and why? What would be the aim or message of the band?
Prof.
METAL:

This is one hell of a tough question. There's no way I could have a band of my own choosing without Bruce Dickinson on vocals. In fact, just give me Iron Maiden from the Seventh Son era. There are, of course, dozens of awesome singers I'd like to have in a band, but Bruce is the man. Halford's good, Dio's good, and Ozzy's no slouch either, but to me Bruce is the perfect metal singer. And he doesn't take it up the ass, though there's nothing wrong with that.

I don't think the band would have an aim or message. To me, it's not good for a band to aim at having a message or whatever. I'd rather have them worry about doing good music instead of making statements.

Prof.ManiC: How does it make you feel when you tell someone you like metal and they start talking about how they like manson,korn and ICP too?
Prof.
METAL:

In all honesty, this doesn't happen too much to me. And when it does, I tell them to listen to some real metal. This goes for people raving about the latest offerings from Metallica too. The reaction I usually get is the assumption that metal is made up of a bunch of guys screaming and making random noises. Most people also assume metal is satanic and unintelligent.

For these reasons, I have strived for years now to educate people about metal and spread the word. Ultimately, I think most fans do this, whether it's with their parents, siblings, girlfriends, or whomever else is in their life. Hell, I loan out albums to anyone who'll give me the time of day, and I frequently make tapes for non-metal people or metal people who don't know anything about the stuff coming out of Europe.

Prof.ManiC: Since my page is devoted to metal and using it to help people control or at least understand their emotions, mind telling us what you like to do when you're feeling down or pissed off to take your mind off it?
Prof.
METAL:

I sleep a lot when I'm not feeling mentally well, which means I sleep whenever I get the chance. Sleeping always helps everything.

In regards to metal helping me control my emotions, I don't really use it as a remedy or anything. It's a constant part of my day, so it's playing whenever I can have it going. I play it in between classes at school, at work, in the car, when I'm going to sleep, when I'm on the phone, etc.

Prof.ManiC: Any final comments?
Prof.
METAL:
Make sure you stop by www.metalmeltdown.com